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Program Highlights

Control of Spin-Orbit Splitting in 2D Semiconductors

Probing and manipulating electronic band structures of 2D materials.

(2017)

Translating Spin Seebeck Effect Physics into Practice

Study reveals thin film physics also manifests in random nanocomposite geometry. 

(2017)

Through the Atomic Scale Looking Glass

Research

In Through the Looking Glass, Alice steps through a mirror into a world in which everything is its mirror image. Realizing that writing in books is reversed, Alice wonders what has happened on the atomic scale. 

(2017)

Programming molecular self-assembly of intrinsically disordered proteins

Research
New model systems of liquid protein assemblies offer insights into naturally-occurring counterparts.
(2017)

The materials genome gets hot!

The goal of this seed project is to bring first-principles theory closer to experimental reality.

(2017)

Simple stretch “flips” the sign of charge carriers

Research
Electricity is the flow of charged particles through a material, such as a wire — a process that resembles a river of water molecules flowing through a canyon. But are the charged particles positive or negative?
(2017)

Down the rabbit hole: Sinking electrons in a Weyl sea

Research
Weyl semimetals are newly discovered topological electronic materials in which surface electrons (Fermi arcs) are topologically connected with those of the bulk. Princeton researchers have found experimental evidence that electrons can transverse the bulk through the special momentum states, called Weyl points, moving between opposing surfaces.
(2016)

Single photon bound states in microwave photonic crystals

Research
Photonic crystals provide an extremely powerful toolset for manipulation of optical dispersion and density of states. Princeton researchers' recent work opens exciting prospects for engineering long-range spin models in the circuit QED architecture, and new opportunities for dissipative quantum state engineering.
(2016)

Glass transition of irreversibly adsorbed nanolayers

Research
Princeton University researchers are investigating how the Tg of an adsorbed layer is influenced by the free surface and employing a fluorescence technique to directly measure the Tg of the adsorbed layer buried in a film.
(2016)

Electron spin coherence of shallow donors in germanium

Research
An international collaboration led by Princeton University IRG3 researchers have measured electron spin coherence in germanium for the first time.
(2016)

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