Skip to content Skip to navigation

Program Highlights

Heterogeneity in the small-scale deformation behavior of disordered nanoparticle packings

Research

At the smallest length scales, disordered systems such as nanoparticle packings and glass resemble the grains of sand on a beach. Lacking a structure, it is very difficult to understand how they deform and flow. We use a technique called atomic force microscopy, in which a sharp probe “feels” and pokes at a sample to measure its shape and mechanical properties.

(2017)

Hybrid Cell-Like Vesicular Assemblies from Bacterial Membranes and Synthetic Components

Research

Hybrid cell-like vesicles were prepared by coassembling (glyco)dendrimersomes with bacterial membrane vesicles (BMVs) derived from E. Coli. These assemblies incorporated transmembrane proteins such as the small fusion protein MgrB tagged with a red fluorescent protein, and glycoconjugates such as lipopolysaccharides and glycoproteins from E. Coli.

(2017)

Three-dimensional Objects from Swollen, Topographically-Patterned Bilayer Films

Research

Building complex three-dimensional (3D) materials from pre-programmed two-dimensional films presents exciting challenges and opportunities. To achieve this goal, researchers inspired by the paper folding techniques of origami and kirigami have successfully utilized the mechanical instabilities of thin films, such as buckling.

(2017)

Control of Spin-Orbit Splitting in 2D Semiconductors

Probing and manipulating electronic band structures of 2D materials.

(2017)

Translating Spin Seebeck Effect Physics into Practice

Study reveals thin film physics also manifests in random nanocomposite geometry. 

(2017)

Through the Atomic Scale Looking Glass

Research

In Through the Looking Glass, Alice steps through a mirror into a world in which everything is its mirror image. Realizing that writing in books is reversed, Alice wonders what has happened on the atomic scale. 

(2017)

Programming molecular self-assembly of intrinsically disordered proteins

Research
New model systems of liquid protein assemblies offer insights into naturally-occurring counterparts.
(2017)

The materials genome gets hot!

The goal of this seed project is to bring first-principles theory closer to experimental reality.

(2017)

Simple stretch “flips” the sign of charge carriers

Research
Electricity is the flow of charged particles through a material, such as a wire — a process that resembles a river of water molecules flowing through a canyon. But are the charged particles positive or negative?
(2017)

Down the rabbit hole: Sinking electrons in a Weyl sea

Research
Weyl semimetals are newly discovered topological electronic materials in which surface electrons (Fermi arcs) are topologically connected with those of the bulk. Princeton researchers have found experimental evidence that electrons can transverse the bulk through the special momentum states, called Weyl points, moving between opposing surfaces.
(2016)

Pages